high school & beyond
1025 Old Farm Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360••••• Main, 805-497-2761Fax, 805-374-1167•••••• www.ConejoAdultSchool.org••••••WASC-accredited

 
 
Learning Center
2015-16 School Year


Dates & Hours:

Mon, Tues, Wed, Thurs
Hours: 3 to 7 p.m.

Materials cost:
$40 per course

Adult Ed main office hours:
Starting Aug 17, 2015
(
excluding holidays):
M - Th,
8:00 am - 7:45 pm;
Friday,
8:00 am - 4:00 pm

More information:
805-497-2761

Staff
Teachers:
Debbie DeBos
Kandy Ono
Jason Rosebaugh

Coordinator:
Sam Kane

 

 

Learning Center
APEX Course Descriptions

 
..Algebra IA S1 & Algebra IA S2

#2011.20 Algebra IA S1 (Core)
#2012.20 Algebra IA S2 (Core)

California's Algebra I-A and I-B courses address the need for an expanded, two-year treatment of traditional high school Algebra I curriculum. Focusing on review of pre-algebra skills and introductory algebra content, Algebra I-A allows students to deepen their understanding of real numbers in their various forms and then extend their knowledge to linear equations in one and two variables. Course topics include integers; the language of algebra; fractions and decimals; exponents; solving equations with four basic operations; solving equations with roots, powers, or multiple steps; functions; and linear equations.

Algebra I-A features ample opportunity for students to hone their computational skills by working through practice problem sets before moving on to formal assessment.

To assist students for whom language presents a barrier to learning or who are not reading at grade level, Algebra I-A includes audio resources in both Spanish and English.

When used together, Algebra I-A and Algebra I-B meet California's Algebra I Mathematics Content Standards.

list of all courses
..Algebra IB S1 & Algebra IB S2

#2021.20 Algebra IB S1 (Core)
#2022.20 Algebra IB S2 (Core)

California's Algebra I-A and I-B courses address the need for an expanded, two-year treatment of traditional high school Algebra I curriculum. Focusing on review of pre-algebra skills and introductory algebra content, Algebra I-A allows students to deepen their understanding of real numbers in their various forms and then extend their knowledge to linear equations in one and two variables. Course topics include integers; the language of algebra; fractions and decimals; exponents; solving equations with four basic operations; solving equations with roots, powers, or multiple steps; functions; and linear equations.

Algebra I-A features ample opportunity for students to hone their computational skills by working through practice problem sets before moving on to formal assessment.

To assist students for whom language presents a barrier to learning or who are not reading at grade level, Algebra I-A includes audio resources in both Spanish and English.

When used together, Algebra I-A and Algebra I-B meet California's Algebra I Mathematics Content Standards.

list of all courses
..English 1A

#2111.20*  English 1A (Core)

English 9 provides an introduction to informational and literary genres and lays a foundation of critical reading and analytical writing skills. Through texts that range from essays, speeches, articles and historical documents to a novel, a play, poetry and short stories, students analyze the use of elements of literature and nonfiction. As they develop their writing skills and respond to claims, students learn to formulate arguments and use textual evidence to support their position.  To hone their listening and speaking skills, students engage with a variety of media types through which they analyze and synthesize information, discuss material, create presentations, and share their work.

English 9 supports all students in developing depth of understanding and higher order skills. Students break down increasingly complex readings with close reading tools, guided instruction and robust scaffolding as they apply each of the lesson's concepts back to its anchor text. Students build their writing and speaking skills in journal responses, discussions, frequent free response exercises, and essays or presentations, learning to communicate clearly and credibly in narrative, argumentative, and explanatory styles.

This course is aligned with the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts.

Course Materials

Semester 1: Optional
The Metamorphosis. Franz Kafka. David Wylie, translator. (Classix Press, 2009).
ISBN-10: 1557427666 / ISBN-13: 9781557427663.
Other editions acceptable.
NOTE: This book is provided in digital format in the course. If students wish to read offline, the above purchase is recommended.

Semester 2: Optional
Macbeth. William Shakespeare. Barbara A. Mowat and Paul Werstine, eds. (Simon & Schuster, 2003).
ISBN-10: 074377103 / ISBN-13: 8780743477109
Other editions acceptable.
NOTE: This book is provided in digital format in the course. If students wish to read offline, the above purchase is recommended.

list of all courses
..English 1B

#2112.20*  English 1B (Core)

English 9 provides an introduction to informational and literary genres and lays a foundation of critical reading and analytical writing skills. Through texts that range from essays, speeches, articles and historical documents to a novel, a play, poetry and short stories, students analyze the use of elements of literature and nonfiction. As they develop their writing skills and respond to claims, students learn to formulate arguments and use textual evidence to support their position.  To hone their listening and speaking skills, students engage with a variety of media types through which they analyze and synthesize information, discuss material, create presentations, and share their work.

English 9 supports all students in developing depth of understanding and higher order skills. Students break down increasingly complex readings with close reading tools, guided instruction and robust scaffolding as they apply each of the lesson's concepts back to its anchor text. Students build their writing and speaking skills in journal responses, discussions, frequent free response exercises, and essays or presentations, learning to communicate clearly and credibly in narrative, argumentative, and explanatory styles.

Course Materials

Semester 1: Optional
The Metamorphosis. Franz Kafka. David Wylie, translator. (Classix Press, 2009).
ISBN-10: 1557427666 / ISBN-13: 9781557427663.
Other editions acceptable.
NOTE: This book is provided in digital format in the course. If students wish to read offline, the above purchase is recommended.

Semester 2: Optional
Macbeth. William Shakespeare. Barbara A. Mowat and Paul Werstine, eds. (Simon & Schuster, 2003).
ISBN-10: 074377103 / ISBN-13: 8780743477109
Other editions acceptable.
NOTE: This book is provided in digital format in the course. If students wish to read offline, the above purchase is recommended.

list of all courses
..English 2A
...

#2121.20*  English 2A (Core)

English 10 builds upon students' foundation of critical reading and analytical writing skills.  Through texts that range from investigative journalism, essays, articles and historical documents to a novel, drama, poetry and short stories, students analyze the use of elements of literature and nonfiction.  As they develop their writing skills and respond to claims, students learn to refine arguments and organize evidence to support their position.  To hone their listening and speaking skills, students engage with a variety of media types through which they analyze and synthesize information, discuss material, create presentations, and share their work.

English 10 supports all students in developing the depth of understanding and higher order skills required by the Common Core.  Students break down increasingly complex readings with close reading tools, guided instruction and robust scaffolding as they apply each of the lesson's concepts back to its anchor text.  Students build their writing and speaking skills in journal responses, discussions, frequent free response exercises, and essays or presentations, learning to communicate clearly and credibly in narrative, argumentative, and explanatory styles.  Throughout the course students are evaluated through a diversity of assessments specifically designed to prepare them for the content, form, and depth of the Common Core assessments.

Course Materials

Semester 1: Required
American Born Chinese. Gene Luen Yang. (Suare Fish, 2008). ISBN-10: 0312384483 / ISBN-13: 9780312384487. Other editions acceptable.
Fast Food Nation. Eric Schlosser. (Mariner Books, 2012). ISBN-10: 0547750331 / ISBN-13: 9780547750330. Other editions acceptable.

list of all courses
..English 2B

#2122.20*  English 2B (Core)

English 10 builds upon students' foundation of critical reading and analytical writing skills.  Through texts that range from investigative journalism, essays, articles and historical documents to a novel, drama, poetry and short stories, students analyze the use of elements of literature and nonfiction.  As they develop their writing skills and respond to claims, students learn to refine arguments and organize evidence to support their position.  To hone their listening and speaking skills, students engage with a variety of media types through which they analyze and synthesize information, discuss material, create presentations, and share their work.

English 10 supports all students in developing the depth of understanding and higher order skills required by the Common Core.  Students break down increasingly complex readings with close reading tools, guided instruction and robust scaffolding as they apply each of the lesson's concepts back to its anchor text.  Students build their writing and speaking skills in journal responses, discussions, frequent free response exercises, and essays or presentations, learning to communicate clearly and credibly in narrative, argumentative, and explanatory styles.  Throughout the course students are evaluated through a diversity of assessments specifically designed to prepare them for the content, form, and depth of the Common Core assessments.

list of all courses
..English 3A

#2131.20 English 3A (Core)

In English 11, students examine the belief systems, events, and literature that have shaped the United States. Starting with the Declaration of Independence, students explore how the greatest American literature tells the stories of individuals who have struggled for independence and freedom: freedom of self, freedom of thought, freedom of home and country. Students reflect on the role of the individual in Romantic and Transcendentalist literature that considers the relationship between citizens and government, and they question whether the American Dream is still achievable while examining Modernist disillusionment with American idealism. As well, reading the words of Frederick Douglass and those of the Civil Rights Act, students look carefully at the experience of African Americans and their struggle to achieve equal rights. Finally, students reflect on how individuals cope with the influence of war, cultural tensions, and technology in the midst of trying to build and secure their own personal identity.

English 11 supports all students in developing the depth of understanding and higher order skills required by the Common Core. Students break down increasingly complex readings with close reading tools, guided instruction, and robust scaffolding as they apply each of the lesson's concepts back to its anchor text.  Students build their writing and speaking skills in journal responses, discussions, frequent free response exercises, and essays or presentations, learning to communicate clearly and credibly in narrative, argumentative, and explanatory styles. Throughout the course, students are evaluated through a diversity of assessments specifically designed to prepare them for the content, form, and depth of the Common Core assessments.

Course Materials

Semester 1: Required
The Great Gatsby. F. Scott Fitzgerald. (Scribner, 1995). ISBN-10: 0743273567 / ISBN-13: 9780743273565. Other editions acceptable.
Semester 2: Required
A Raisin in the Sun. Lorraine Hansberry. (Vintage, 2004). ISBN-10: 0679755330 / ISBN-13: 9780679755333. Other editions acceptable.
A Way to Rainy Mountain. N. Scott Momaday. (University of New Mexico Press, 1969). ISBN-10: 0826304362 / ISBN-13: 9780826304360. Other editions acceptable.

list of all courses
..English 3B

#2132.20 English 3B(Core)

In English 11, students examine the belief systems, events, and literature that have shaped the United States. Starting with the Declaration of Independence, students explore how the greatest American literature tells the stories of individuals who have struggled for independence and freedom: freedom of self, freedom of thought, freedom of home and country. Students reflect on the role of the individual in Romantic and Transcendentalist literature that considers the relationship between citizens and government, and they question whether the American Dream is still achievable while examining Modernist disillusionment with American idealism. As well, reading the words of Frederick Douglass and those of the Civil Rights Act, students look carefully at the experience of African Americans and their struggle to achieve equal rights. Finally, students reflect on how individuals cope with the influence of war, cultural tensions, and technology in the midst of trying to build and secure their own personal identity.

English 11 supports all students in developing the depth of understanding and higher order skills required by the Common Core. Students break down increasingly complex readings with close reading tools, guided instruction, and robust scaffolding as they apply each of the lesson's concepts back to its anchor text.  Students build their writing and speaking skills in journal responses, discussions, frequent free response exercises, and essays or presentations, learning to communicate clearly and credibly in narrative, argumentative, and explanatory styles. Throughout the course, students are evaluated through a diversity of assessments specifically designed to prepare them for the content, form, and depth of the Common Core assessments.

Course Materials

Semester 1: Required
The Great Gatsby. F. Scott Fitzgerald. (Scribner, 1995). ISBN-10: 0743273567 / ISBN-13: 9780743273565. Other editions acceptable.
Semester 2: Required
A Raisin in the Sun. Lorraine Hansberry. (Vintage, 2004). ISBN-10: 0679755330 / ISBN-13: 9780679755333. Other editions acceptable.
A Way to Rainy Mountain. N. Scott Momaday. (University of New Mexico Press, 1969). ISBN-10: 0826304362 / ISBN-13: 9780826304360. Other editions acceptable.

list of all courses
..English 4A

#2141.20 English 4A (Core)

English 12 asks students to delve into the mingled history of British and World literature. It asks students to imagine: Face to face with a human being unlike any you've seen before, do you feel fear, awe, or curiosity? Do you look for what you can give, what you can take, or what you can share? Do you find unfamiliar people and customs magical, mysterious, or monstrous? Students explore how humans interact with and influence each other — historically, socially, and otherwise — and examine the complexities of cultural identity in our global and fast-changing world.

English 12 supports all students in developing depth of understanding and higher order skills. Students break down increasingly complex readings with close reading tools, guided instruction, and robust scaffolding as they apply each of the lesson's concepts back to its anchor text.  Students build their writing and speaking skills in journal responses, discussions, frequent free response exercises, and essays or presentations, learning to communicate clearly and credibly in narrative, argumentative, and explanatory styles.

Course Materials

Semester 1: Optional
Robinson Crusoe. Daniel Defoe. (Barnes & Nobel Classics, 2005). ISBN-10: 1593083602 / ISBN-13: 9781593083601. Other editions acceptable. NOTE: This book is provided in digital format in the course. If students wish to read offline, the above purchase is recommended.
The Tempest. William Shakespeare. (Simon & Schuster, 2004). ISBN-10: 0156027321 / ISBN-13: 9780743482837. Other editions acceptable. NOTE: This book is provided in digital format in the course. If student wish to read offline, the above purchase is recommended.

Semester 2: Required
Life of Pi. Yann Martel. (Mariner Books, 2003). ISBN-10: 0516027321 / ISBN-13: 9780156027328. Other editions acceptable.
Semester 2: Optional
Frankenstein. Mary Shelley. (Dover Publications, 1994). ISBN-10: 0486282112 / ISBN-13: 9780486282114.
Other editions acceptable.
NOTE: This book is provided in digital format in the course. If students wish to read offline, the above purchase is recommended.

list of all courses
..English 4B

#2142.20 English 4B (Core)

English 12 asks students to delve into the mingled history of British and World literature. It asks students to imagine: Face to face with a human being unlike any you've seen before, do you feel fear, awe, or curiosity? Do you look for what you can give, what you can take, or what you can share? Do you find unfamiliar people and customs magical, mysterious, or monstrous? Students explore how humans interact with and influence each other — historically, socially, and otherwise — and examine the complexities of cultural identity in our global and fast-changing world.

English 12 supports all students in developing depth of understanding and higher order skills. Students break down increasingly complex readings with close reading tools, guided instruction, and robust scaffolding as they apply each of the lesson's concepts back to its anchor text.  Students build their writing and speaking skills in journal responses, discussions, frequent free response exercises, and essays or presentations, learning to communicate clearly and credibly in narrative, argumentative, and explanatory styles.

Course Materials

Semester 1: Optional
Robinson Crusoe. Daniel Defoe. (Barnes & Nobel Classics, 2005). ISBN-10: 1593083602 / ISBN-13: 9781593083601. Other editions acceptable. NOTE: This book is provided in digital format in the course. If students wish to read offline, the above purchase is recommended.
The Tempest. William Shakespeare. (Simon & Schuster, 2004). ISBN-10: 0156027321 / ISBN-13: 9780743482837. Other editions acceptable. NOTE: This book is provided in digital format in the course. If student wish to read offline, the above purchase is recommended.

Semester 2: Required
Life of Pi. Yann Martel. (Mariner Books, 2003). ISBN-10: 0516027321 / ISBN-13: 9780156027328. Other editions acceptable.
Semester 2: Optional
Frankenstein. Mary Shelley. (Dover Publications, 1994). ISBN-10: 0486282112 / ISBN-13: 9780486282114.
Other editions acceptable.
NOTE: This book is provided in digital format in the course. If students wish to read offline, the above purchase is recommended.

list of all courses
..U.S. History A

#2200.20 U.S. History A (Core)

This course traces the nation's history from the pre-colonial period to the end of the American Civil War. It emphasizes the colonial period and the creation of a new nation and examines the beliefs and philosophies that informed the American Revolution and the subsequent formation of the government and political system.
Students first explore the earliest points of contact between individuals from Europe, Africa, and North America. They then probe the economic, cultural, and social motives for the nation's expansion, as well as the conflicting notions of liberty that eventually resulted in the Civil War. Woven throughout this narrative history is a strong focus on the changing conditions of women, African Americans, and other minority groups. The ways in which Americans lived, ate, dressed, and interacted are also highlighted.

The course emphasizes the development of historical analysis skills such as comparing and contrasting, differentiating between facts and interpretations, considering multiple perspectives, and analyzing cause-and-effect relationships. These skills are applied to text interpretation and in written assignments that guide learners step-by-step through problem-solving activities.

The content is based on standards from the National Council for History Education (1997), the National Center for History in the Schools (1996), and the National Council for Social Studies (1994) and is aligned to state standards.

list of all courses
..U.S. History B

#2210.20 U.S. History B (Core)

This course traces the nation's history from the end of the Civil War to the present. It describes the emergence of the United States as an industrial nation, highlighting social policy as well as its role in modern world affairs.

Students evaluate the attempts to bind the nation together during Reconstruction while also exploring the growth of an industrial economy. Moving into the 20th and 21st centuries, students probe the economic and diplomatic interactions between the United States and other world players while investigating how the world wars, the Cold War, and the "information revolution" affected the lives of ordinary Americans. Woven through this chronological sequence is a strong focus on the changing conditions of women, African Americans, and other minority groups.
The course emphasizes the development of historical analysis skills such as comparing and contrasting, differentiating between facts and interpretations, considering multiple perspectives, and analyzing cause-and-effect relationships. These skills are applied to text interpretation and in written assignments that guide learners step-by-step through problem-solving activities.

The content is based on standards from the National Council for History Education (1997), the National Center for History in the Schools (1996), and the National Council for Social Studies (1994) and is aligned to state standards.

list of all courses
..American Government

#2250.20 American Government (Core)

U.S. Government and Politics offers a tightly focused and scaffolded curriculum that uses the perspective of political institutions to explore the history, organization, and functions of the U.S. government. Beginning with basic theories of government, moving to the Declaration of Independence, and continuing to the present day, the course explores the relationship between individual Americans and the governing bodies. It covers the political culture of the country and gains insight into the challenges faced by presidents, congressional representatives, and other political activists. It also covers the roles of political parties, interest groups, the media, and the Supreme Court.

U.S. Government and Politics is designed to fall in the fourth year of social studies instruction. Students perfect their analytic writing through a scaffolded series of analytic assignments and written lesson tests. Students read annotated primary documents and apply those documents to the course content.

The content is based on standards from the National Council for History Education (1997), the National Center for History in the Schools (1996), and the National Council for Social Studies (1994) and is aligned to state standards.

list of all courses
..Economics

#2260.20 Economics (Core)

U.S. and Global Economics offers a tightly focused and scaffolded curriculum that provides an introduction to key economic principles. The course covers fundamental properties of economics, including an examination of markets from both historical and current perspectives; the basics of supply and demand; the theories of early economic philosophers such as Adam Smith and David Ricardo; theories of value; the concept of money and how it evolved; the role of banks, investment houses, and the Federal Reserve; Keynesian economics; the productivity, wages, investment, and growth involved in capitalism; unemployment, inflations, and the national debt; and a survey of markets in areas such as China, Europe, and the Middle East.

U.S. and Global Economics is designed to fall in the fourth year of social studies instruction. Students perfect their analytic writing through a scaffolded series of analytic assignments and written lesson tests. They also apply basic mathematics to economic concepts. Students read selections from annotated primary documents and apply those readings to the course content.

The content is based on standards from the National Council for History Education (1997), the National Center for History in the Schools (1996), and the National Council for Social Studies (1994) and is aligned to state standards.

list of all courses
..World History A

#2300.20 World History A (Core)

World History to the Renaissance traces the development of civilizations around the world from prehistory to the Renaissance.

The course covers major themes in world history, including the development and influence of human-geographic relationships, political and social structures, economic systems, major religions and belief systems, science and technology, and the arts.

Topics covered in this course include the birth of civilizations; the classical civilizations of India, China, Greece, and Rome; the rise of new empires such as the Byzantine; and an examination of civilizations in  Africa and North and South America. From there, students journey to the Middle Ages and into the Renaissance.
Primary source documents, which appear frequently, encourage students to make connections to evidence from the past. Writing skills are honed through a spiraled sequence of short analytic pieces.

The content is based on standards from the National Council for History Education (1997), the National Center for History in the Schools (1996), and the National Council for Social Studies (1994) and is aligned to state standards.

list of all courses
..World History B

#2310.20 World History B (Core)

World History since the Renaissance covers the development of civilizations around the world from the Renaissance to the present.

The course covers major themes in world history, including the development and influence of human-geographic relationships, political and social structures, economic systems, major religions and belief systems, the effects of science and technology, the vital role of the arts, and the importance of trade and cultural exchange.

Topics covered in this course include the Reformation and its legacy, the Scientific Revolution, European exploration, the Enlightenment, political revolutions, the rise of nation-states, the industrial era, the spread of imperialism, and the issues and conflicts of the 20th and 21st centuries.

Primary source documents, which appear frequently, encourage students to make connections to evidence from the past. Writing skills are honed through a spiraled sequence of short analytic pieces.

The content is based on standards from the National Council for History Education (1997), the National Center for History in the Schools (1996), and the National Council for Social Studies (1994) and is aligned to state standards.

list of all courses
..Health

#2400.20 Health (Core)

Skills for Health is a valuable, skills-based health education course designed for general education in grades 9 through 12. Skills for Health helps students develop knowledge, attitudes, and essential skills in a variety of health-related subjects, including mental and emotional health; nutrition; physical activity; substance use and abuse; injury prevention and safety; and personal health, environmental conservation, and community health resources.

Through use of accessible information and real-life simulations, students apply the seven health skills. These include access to valid health information; self-management; analysis of internal and external influences; interpersonal communication; decision-making; goal setting; and advocacy. Students who complete Skills for Health build the skills they need to protect, enhance, and promote their own health and the health of others.

The content is based on the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) standards and is aligned to state standards.

list of all courses
..Life Science A

#2600 Life Science A (Core)

Biology focuses on the mastery of basic biological concepts and models while building scientific inquiry skills and exploring the connections between living things and their environment.

The course begins with an introduction to the nature of science and biology, including the major themes of structure and function, matter and energy flow, systems, and the interconnectedness of life. Students then apply those themes to the structure and function of the cell, cellular metabolism, and biogeochemical cycles. Building on this foundation, students explore the connections and interactions between living things by studying genetics, ecosystems and natural selection, and evolution. The course ends with an applied look at human biology.

Scientific inquiry skills are embedded in the direct instruction, wherein students learn to ask scientific questions, form and test hypotheses, and use logic and evidence to draw conclusions about the concepts.

Lab activities reinforce critical thinking, writing, and communication skills and help students develop a deeper understanding of the nature of science.

The content is based on the National Science Education Standards (NSES) and is aligned with state standards.

Course Materials

Semesters 1 and 2: Required
Biology: Exploring Life Lab Manual, Student ed. Neil Campbell, Brad Williamson, and Robin Heyden (Prentice Hall, 2004).
ISBN-10: 0130642665 / ISBN-13: 9780130642660
Semesters 1 and 2: Optional
This course includes the option of either hands-on or dry lab activities. Dry labs require only the lab manual; there are no additional lab materials needed for these activities. Hands-on labs require specified materials. For a list of hands-on lab materials, go to http://support.apexlearning.com. In the upper-right corner, under Quick Links, select Course Materials.

list of all courses
..Life Science B

#2610 Life Science B (Core)

Biology focuses on the mastery of basic biological concepts and models while building scientific inquiry skills and exploring the connections between living things and their environment.

The course begins with an introduction to the nature of science and biology, including the major themes of structure and function, matter and energy flow, systems, and the interconnectedness of life. Students then apply those themes to the structure and function of the cell, cellular metabolism, and biogeochemical cycles. Building on this foundation, students explore the connections and interactions between living things by studying genetics, ecosystems and natural selection, and evolution. The course ends with an applied look at human biology.

Scientific inquiry skills are embedded in the direct instruction, wherein students learn to ask scientific questions, form and test hypotheses, and use logic and evidence to draw conclusions about the concepts.

Lab activities reinforce critical thinking, writing, and communication skills and help students develop a deeper understanding of the nature of science.

The content is based on the National Science Education Standards (NSES) and is aligned with state standards.

Course Materials

Semesters 1 and 2: Required
Biology: Exploring Life Lab Manual, Student ed. Neil Campbell, Brad Williamson, and Robin Heyden (Prentice Hall, 2004).
ISBN-10: 0130642665 / ISBN-13: 9780130642660
Semesters 1 and 2: Optional
This course includes the option of either hands-on or dry lab activities. Dry labs require only the lab manual; there are no additional lab materials needed for these activities. Hands-on labs require specified materials. For a list of hands-on lab materials, go to http://support.apexlearning.com. In the upper-right corner, under Quick Links, select Course Materials.

list of all courses
..Physical Science A

#2620 Physical Science A (Core)

Physical Science offers a focused curriculum designed around the understanding of critical physical science concepts, including the nature and structure of matter, the characteristics of energy, and the mastery of critical scientific skills.

Course topics include an introduction to kinematics, including gravity and two-dimensional motion; force; momentum; waves; electricity; atoms; the periodic table of elements; molecular bonding; chemical reactivity; gases; and an introduction to nuclear energy. Teacher-scored labs encourage students to apply the scientific method.

The content is based on the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) standards and is aligned with state standards.

Semesters 1 and 2: Optional
This course includes the option of either hands-on or dry lab activities. No materials are required for dry lab activities. Hands-on labs require specified materials. For a list of hands-on lab materials, go to http://support.apexlearning.com. In the upper-right corner, under Quick Links, select Course Materials.

list of all courses
..Physical Science B

#2630 Physical Science B (Core)

Physical Science offers a focused curriculum designed around the understanding of critical physical science concepts, including the nature and structure of matter, the characteristics of energy, and the mastery of critical scientific skills.

Course topics include an introduction to kinematics, including gravity and two-dimensional motion; force; momentum; waves; electricity; atoms; the periodic table of elements; molecular bonding; chemical reactivity; gases; and an introduction to nuclear energy. Teacher-scored labs encourage students to apply the scientific method.

The content is based on the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) standards and is aligned with state standards.

Semesters 1 and 2: Optional
This course includes the option of either hands-on or dry lab activities. No materials are required for dry lab activities. Hands-on labs require specified materials. For a list of hands-on lab materials, go to http://support.apexlearning.com. In the upper-right corner, under Quick Links, select Course Materials.

list of all courses
..Geography and Cultures

#2700 Geography and Cultures

Geography and World Cultures offers a tightly focused and scaffolded curriculum that enables students to explore how geographic features, human relationships, political and social structures, economics, science and technology, and the arts have developed and influenced life in countries around the world. Along the way, students are given rigorous instruction on how to read maps, charts, and graphs, and how to create them.

Geography and World Cultures is based on standards from the National Council for History Education (1997), the National Center for History in the Schools (1996), and the National Council for Social Studies (1994) and is aligned to state standards.
Geography and World Cultures is designed as the first course in the social studies sequence. It develops note-taking skills, teaches the basic elements of analytic writing, and introduces students to the close examination of primary documents.

list of all courses
..Art Appreciation

#2720 Art Appreciation

Art Appreciation is a survey of the history of Western visual arts, with a primary focus on painting. Students begin with an introduction to the basic principles of painting and learn how to critique and compare works of art. Students then explore prehistoric and early Greek and Roman art before they move on to the Middle Ages. Emphasis is placed on the Renaissance and the principles and masters that emerged in Italy and northern Europe. Students continue their art tour with the United States during the 20th century, a time of great innovation as abstract art took center stage. While Western art is the course's primary focus, students will finish the course by studying artistic traditions from Africa, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas.

Coverage of each artistic movement highlights historical context and introduces students to key artists that represent a variety of geographic locations. Throughout the course, students apply what they have learned about art critique to analyze and evaluate both individual artists and individual works of art.

Art Appreciation is based on national standards developed by the Consortium of National Arts Education Associations, as well as key state standards. It encompasses a variety of skills to enable students to critique, compare, and perhaps influence their own works of art.

list of all courses
..Business Applications

#2740 Business Applications

Business Applications prepares students to succeed in the workplace. Students begin by establishing an awareness of the roles essential to an organization's success, and then work to develop an understanding of professional communications and leadership skills. In doing so, students gain proficiency with word processing, email, and presentation management software.

This course allows students to explore careers in business while learning skills applicable to any professional setting. Through a series of hands-on activities, students will create, analyze, and critique reports, letters, project plans, presentations, and other professional communications. Regular engagement in active learning ensures students can continually refine the skills necessary to prepare them for work. In addition, students will evaluate the qualifications required for specific careers so they can identify opportunities that are of interest to them.

Business Applications is an introductory level Career and Technical Education course applicable to programs of study in business, management, and administration; information technology; and other career clusters. This course is aligned with state and national standards. Students who successfully complete the course can go on to obtain the Microsoft® Office Specialist: Microsoft® Office Word certification.*

*Microsoft is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.

Required:
Word processing software and presentation management software.

list of all courses
..Creative Writing

#2760 Creative Writing

Creative Writing is an English elective course that focuses on the exploration of short fiction and poetry, culminating in a written portfolio that includes one revised short story and three to five polished poems. Students draft, revise, and polish fiction and poetry through writing exercises, developing familiarity with literary terms and facility with the writing process as they study elements of creative writing.

Elements of fiction writing explored in this course include attention to specific detail, observation, character development, setting, plot, and point of view. In the poetry units, students learn about the use of sensory details and imagery, figurative language, and sound devices including rhyme, rhythm and alliteration. They also explore poetic forms ranging from found poems and slam poetry to traditional sonnets and villanelles.

In addition to applying literary craft elements in guided creative writing exercises, students engage in critical reading activities designed to emphasize the writing craft of a diverse group of authors. Students study short stories by authors such as Bharati Mukherjee and Edgar Allan Poe, learning how to create believable characters and develop setting and plot. Likewise, students read poetry by canonical greats such as W. B. Yeats and Emily Dickinson as well as contemporary writers such as Pablo Neruda, Sherman Alexie, and Alice Notley. Studying the writing technique of a range of authors provides students with models and inspiration as they develop their own voices and refine their understanding of the literary craft.
By taking a Creative Writing course, students find new approaches to reading and writing that can affect them on a personal level, as the skills they gain in each lesson directly benefit their own creative goals. Students who are already actively engaged writers and readers learn additional tools and insight into the craft of writing to help them further hone their skills and encourage their creative as well as academic growth.

All English elective content is based on the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) standards.

list of all courses
..Financial Literacy

#2770 Financial Literacy

Financial Literacy helps students recognize and develop vital skills that connect life and career goals with personalized strategies and milestone-based action plans. Students explore concepts and work toward a mastery of personal finance skills, deepening their understanding of key ideas and extending their knowledge through a variety of problem-solving applications.

Course topics include career planning; income, taxation, and budgeting; savings accounts, checking accounts, and electronic banking; interest, investments, and stocks; cash, debit, credit, and credit scores; insurance; and consumer advice on how to buy, rent, or lease a car or house.

These topics are solidly supported by writing and discussion activities. Journal activities provide opportunities for students to both apply concepts on a personal scale and analyze scenarios from a third-party perspective. Discussions help students network with one another by sharing personal strategies and goals and recognizing the diversity of life and career plans within a group.

To assist students for whom language presents a barrier to learning or who are not reading at grade level, Financial Literacy includes audio resources in English.
This course is aligned with state standards as they apply to Financial Literacy and adheres to the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' (NCTM) Problem Solving, Communication, Reasoning, and Mathematical Connections Process standards.

list of all courses
..Math Foundations I & II

#2780 Math Foundations I

Math Foundations I offers a structured remediation solution based on the NCTM Curricular Focal Points and is designed to expedite student progress in acquiring 3rd- to 5th-grade skills. The course is appropriate for use as remediation for students in grades 6 to 12. When used in combination, Math Foundations I and Math Foundations II (covering grades 6 to 8) effectively remediate computational skills and conceptual understanding needed to undertake high school–level math courses with confidence.

Math Foundations I empowers students to progress at their optimum pace through over 80 semester hours of interactive instruction and assessment spanning 3rd- to 5th-grade math skills. Carefully paced, guided instruction is accompanied by interactive practice that is engaging and accessible. Formative assessments help students to understand areas of weakness and improve performance, while summative assessments chart progress and skill development. Early in the course, students develop general strategies for honing their problem-solving skills. Subsequent units provide a problem-solving strand that asks students to practice applying specific math skills to a variety of real-world contexts.

The content is based on the National Council of Teachers of Math (NCTM) April 2006 publication, Curricular Focal Points for Prekindergarten through Grade 8 Mathematics: A Quest for Coherence, and is aligned with state standards.

#2781 Math Foundations II

Based on the NCTM Curricular Focal Points, Math Foundations II is designed to expedite student progress in acquiring 6th- to 8th-grade skills. The course is appropriate for use as remediation at the high school level or as middle school curriculum. The program simultaneously builds the computational skills and conceptual understanding needed to undertake high school-level math courses with confidence.

The course's carefully paced, guided instruction is accompanied by interactive practice that is engaging and accessible. Formative assessments help students to understand areas of weakness and improve performance, while summative assessments chart progress and skill development. Early in the course, students develop general strategies for honing their problem-solving skills. Subsequent units provide a problem-solving strand that asks students to practice applying specific math skills to a variety of real-world contexts.

The content is based on the National Council of Teachers of Math (NCTM) April 2006 publication, Curricular Focal Points for Prekindergarten through Grade 8 Mathematics: A Quest for Coherence, and is aligned with state standards.

list of all courses
..Mathematics of Personal Finance

#2800 Mathematics of Personal Finance

Mathematics of Personal Finance focuses on real-world financial literacy, personal finance, and business subjects. Students apply what they learned in Algebra I and Geometry to topics including personal income, taxes, checking and savings accounts, credit, loans and payments, car leasing and purchasing, home mortgages, stocks, insurance, and retirement planning.

Students then extend their investigations using more advanced mathematics, such as systems of equations (when studying cost and profit issues) and exponential functions (when calculating interest problems). To assist students for whom language presents a barrier to learning or who are not reading at grade level, Mathematics of Personal Finance includes audio resources in both Spanish and English.

This course is aligned with state standards as they apply to Mathematics of Personal Finance and adheres to the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' (NCTM) Problem Solving, Communication, Reasoning, and Mathematical Connections Process standards.

Semesters 1 and 2: Required
TI-84 Plus, TI-83, or TI-83 Plus Calculator

list of all courses
..Media Literacy

#2820 Media Literacy

Media Literacy teaches students how to build the critical thinking, writing, and reading skills required in a media-rich and increasingly techno-centric world. In a world saturated with media messages, digital environments, and social networking, concepts of literacy must expand to include all forms of media. Today's students need to be able to read, comprehend, analyze, and respond to non-traditional media with the same skill level they engage with traditional print sources.

A major topic in Media Literacy is non-traditional media reading skills, including how to approach, analyze, and respond to advertisements, blogs, websites, social media, news media, and wikis. Students also engage in a variety of writing activities in non-traditional media genres, such as blogging and podcast scripting.
Students consider their own positions as consumers of media and explore ways to use non-traditional media to become more active and thoughtful citizens. Students learn how to ask critical questions about the intended audience and underlying purpose of media messages, and study factors which can contribute to bias and affect credibility.

The course content is based on The National Association for Media Literacy Education's Core Principles of Media Literacy Education, as well as aggregate state standards and research into best pedagogical practices.

list of all courses
..Multicultural Studies

#2840 Multicultural Studies

Multicultural Studies is a one-semester elective history and sociology course that examines the United States as a multicultural nation. The course emphasizes the perspectives of minority groups while allowing students from all backgrounds to better understand and appreciate how race, culture and ethnicity, and identity contribute to their experiences.

Major topics in the course include identity, immigration, assimilation and distinctiveness, power and oppression, struggles for rights, regionalism, culture and the media, and the formation of new cultures.

In online Discussions and Polls, students reflect critically on their own experiences as well as those of others. Interactive multimedia activities include personal and historical accounts to which students can respond using methods of inquiry from history, sociology, and psychology. Written assignments and Journals provide opportunities for students to practice and develop skills for thinking and communicating about race, culture, ethnicity, and identity.

The content and skill focus of this interdisciplinary course is based on the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) Expectations of Excellence: Curriculum Standards for Social Studies as well as the National Standards for History published by the National Center for History in Schools (NCHS).

list of all courses
..Music Appreciation

#2860 Music Appreciation

Music Appreciation is a streamlined course that introduces student to the history, theory, and genres of music, from the most primitive surviving examples, through the classical to the most contemporary in the world at large. The course is offered in a two-semester format: The first semester covers primitive musical forms, classical music, and American jazz. The second semester presents the rich modern traditions, including: gospel, folk, soul, blues, Latin rhythms, rock and roll, and hip-hop.

The course explores the interface of music and social movements and examines how the emergent global society and the Internet is bringing musical forms together in new ways from all around the world.

list of all courses
..Psychology

#2880 Psychology

Psychology provides a solid overview of the field's major domains: methods, biopsychology, cognitive and developmental psychology, and variations in individual and group behavior.

By focusing on significant scientific research and on the questions that are most important to psychologists, students see psychology as an evolving science. Each topic clusters around challenge questions, such as “What is happiness?” Students answer these questions before, during, and after they interact with direct instruction.

The content is based on the American Psychological Association's National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula. The teaching methods draw from the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) teaching standards.

list of all courses
..Sociology

#2920 Sociology

Sociology examines why people think and behave as they do in relationships, groups, institutions, and societies.

Major course topics include individual and group identity, social structures and institutions, social change, social stratification, social dynamics in recent and current events, the effects of social change on individuals, and the research methods used by social scientists.

In online discussions and polls, students reflect critically on their own experiences and ideas, as well as on the ideas of sociologists. Interactive multimedia activities include personal and historical accounts to which students can respond, using methods of inquiry from sociology. Written assignments provide opportunities to practice and develop skills in thinking and communicating about human relationships, individual and group identity, and all other major course topics.
The course content is based on the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) Expectations of Excellence: Curriculum Standards for Social Studies.

list of all courses
..Skills for Health

#2940 Skills for Health

Introduction to Health Science provides the foundational knowledge and skills students need for careers in health care. Students begin by exploring the services, structure, and professions of the health care system. The remainder of the course focuses on day-to-day skills and expectations for health professionals, which include promoting wellness, maintaining a safe environment, creating medical records, and practicing good communication, collaboration, and leadership.

Using real-life scenarios and application-driven activities, students learn the responsibilities and challenges of being health care professionals. In addition to building their understanding of technical concepts and skills, students evaluate the qualifications required for specific careers and develop personal career plans to pursue work in the health care industry.

Introduction to Health Science is an introductory-level Career and Technical Education course for programs of study in health sciences. This course is aligned with state and national standards.

list of all courses
 
..HS Directory: Newbury, Thousand Oaks, Westlake*

NPHS/TOHS/WHS Directory*

*This directory is for reference only; different credit and course requirements apply for obtaining an Adult High School Diploma.
 
Learning Center Courses
Click on course title for description
Cred Title
5 Algebra 1A S1
5 Algebra 1A S2
5 Algebra 1B S1
5 Algebra 1B S2
5 English 1A
5 English 1B
5 English 2A
5 English 2B
5 English 3A
5 English 3B
5 English 4A
5 English 4B
5 U.S. History A
5 U.S. History B
5 American Government
5 Economics
5 World History A
5 World History B
5 Health
5 Life Science A
5 Life Science B
5 Physical Science A
5 Physical Science B
5 Geography & Cultures
5 Art Appreciation
5 Business Applications
5 Creative Writing
5 Financial Literacy
5 Math Foundations I & II
5 Math of Personal Finance
5 Media Literacy
5 Multicultural Studies
5 Music Apprecication
5 Psychology
5 Sociology
5 Skills for Health
* Descriptions from APEX Learning

For more information, please call 805-497-2761 x1010, or e-mail Sam Kane at SamK@ConejoAdultEd.org
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